Craft-oholics Unite?

So, who else grew up doing crafts? Who remembers ironing shaved crayolas between wax paper to create stained glass windows? Using papier mache strips all over balloons to make colorful bowls? Modeling clay into little milk and sugar dispensers? Painting rocks and creating your own special pet rocks?

I LOVED all of that…I learned how to sew when I was young, and even took up knitting at an early age. I can remember learning how to gather seams and embroider smocked nighties. I get kinda goofy and have tried so many crafts, but other than knitting, I haven’t really been able to learn much new since I started soaping full time in 2013. So…I am signing up for a weaving class! I hope to start next week and consider it time to self.

I toyed with bee keeping classes, and might still try my hand somewhere down the line.  But weaving? I’ve always wanted to do that!

So what fun crafts do you love? What would YOU love to learn to do?

Cheers –

Karen

 

Got (Goat) Milk?

I know…everyone makes goat milk soaps these days (it seems, anyway). But do you know why?

Five good reasons to start using goat’s milk soap

Delays signs of skin aging:

Goat’s milk soap delays signs of skin again due to its high content of alpha-hydroxy acids such as lactic acid. Alpha-hydroxy acids break down dead skin cell bonds, removing dead skin cells from the skin’s surface and leaving behind new cells on the surface that appear smoother and more youthful.

Not a chemical counterfeit:

Water-based soaps on mainstream supermarket shelves use harsh chemical acids to break down dead skin cells. The lasting effect of chemical acids on the skin is more similar to a chemical “burn.” Alpha hydroxyl acids found in goat’s milk, work with skin instead of breaking it down and aging it further.

Anti-inflammatory properties:

Goat’s milk reduces skin inflammation due to its fat molecule content. The cream present in goat’s milk is a moisturizer, soothing dry and damaged skin, possessing an anti-inflammatory effect.

Loaded with essentials:

Goat’s milk is packed full of essential nutrients and vitamins like vitamin D, C, B1, B6, B12, and E, that feed the skin and are absorbed into the body.

Treats acne:

Studies now show that goat’s milk is effective for treating acne and skin conditions. This is primarily because goat’s milk has anti-bacterial properties that delay the growth of microbial organisms that spur the spread of acne.

Learn more:  http://www.naturalnews.com/040766_goats_milk_soap_personal_care_products.html#ixzz41qzJzZjD

I use fresh-from-the-farm goat milk from local farms (not to mention beeswax and honey, too!) so it’s not super-processed, and retains all the natural properties.

And…it’s absolutely lovely in the goat milk lotion I make, too!

Cheers –

Karen

Calendula (C. officinalas)

800px-Illustration_Calendula_officinalis0

 

Calendula oil is still used medicinally. The oil of C. officinalis is used as an anti-inflammatory, an antitumor agent, and a remedy for healing wounds.[8]

Plant pharmacological studies have suggested that Calendula extracts have antiviral, antigenotoxic, and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro.[9] In herbalismCalendula in suspension or in tincture is used topically for treating acne, reducing inflammation, controlling bleeding, and soothing irritated tissue.[10][11] Limited evidence indicates Calendula cream or ointment is effective in treating radiation dermatitis.[12][13] Topical application of C. officinalis ointment has helped to prevent dermatitis, pain, and missed radiation treatments in randomized trials.[11]

Calendula has been used traditionally for abdominal cramps and constipation.[14]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendula

Such a workhorse of a little flower! Who else has tried growing Calendula in their gardens? (Please note…it’s not just a regular little marigold, it’s a different plant altogether!)

I use Calendula in two ways – I grind it up and add it to my Gardener’s Soap for the color and calming qualities. I also infuse it in avocado oil to make my Calendula Salve – great for cracked fingers, burns, and small cuts. Also good on baby’s bottoms!  It also makes for a great Gardener’s salve after working in the garden all day. Made with local beeswax and a kiss of essential oils to round out all the goodness!

Cheers – and stay clean!

~ Karen